Wow … a couple of Democrats could be the key to grocery tax relief

Three weeks into the legislative session, Republican Jeff Siddoway is sticking to his promise to block any tax cut that might come to his committee, unless he gets the education funding he’s after. Siddoway, the chairman of the Senate Local Government and Taxation Committee, certainly seems to have all the power. But I’m actually starting to think the Dos Equis most interesting men in the Senate—the ones who quietly wield all the power on Siddoway’s committee—are Democrats Grant Burgoyne and Elliot Werk. That might shock some people who’d never imagine Boise Democrats in the power positions. But here’s why the
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Medicaid and the problem of federalism

A Congressman Butch Otter, were he in Congress in 2009, would, no doubt in my mind, have voted against Obamacare as a terrible national policy.  He would have opposed the Medicaid expansion component of it as a policy corrosive of limited government and unaffordable.  He would have opposed the setting up of exchanges, the employer mandate, the mandates on what an adequate insurance plan is, and the taxes on “Cadillac” plans and sundry other things. Today’s topic is the Medicaid expansion, so let us focus on that.  If it was such a terrible policy that a Congressman Otter would have
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Medicaid expansion has unintended consequences

The debate over whether or not to expand Medicaid insurance coverage, or for that matter the debate over Obamacare in entirety, is a series of one compromise over another. But despite all the efforts to find a “middle ground,” nothing is being done to address the root incentive problems in the health care services market. The most recent compromise is the agreement Indiana reached with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services that will require new Medicaid recipients in that state to pay at least $1, and up to 2 percent, of their monthly insurance premiums from this government
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Another argument against ‘Add the Words’ proposal

There are many good reasons to oppose “adding the words” to Idaho’s human rights amendment. Not the least among these reasons is that discrimination is part of human life and the free market deals with discrimination in the least socially disruptive way. We discriminate when we shop at Albertson’s rather than Fred Meyer, when we rent to the married couple with steady jobs instead of the cohabiting couple on unemployment, or when we choose to attend the Shakespeare festival instead of the movies. Discrimination also has a price: If consumers or employers limit the range of their choices, the seller
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Executions should not be made even less transparent

A bill sitting in the Senate Judiciary & Rules committee is referred to by the shortcut, “Executions, confidentiality,” but Senate Bill 1005 is confusing confidentiality with a lack of transparency and accountability. Regardless of whether you support the death penalty on principle, intentionally ending a human life is inarguably one of the most serious decisions a government will ever make. Attempting to conceal the details of such a grave decision and process is something we would expect to see under an old-school, totalitarian dictatorship, not a modern government ostensibly by and for the people. There are three concerning components to
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