Fulcher: Don’t trust a government with weapons if they won’t trust you with yours

By Russ Fulcher | Idaho Freedom Foundation Sitting deep in the bowels of the Idaho Capitol is a bill that, if passed, would allow law-abiding citizens to carry a concealed weapon without a government-approved license. This so-called Constitutional Carry legislation has met significant resistance, even though it's a significant step forward in gun rights in the traditionally firearms-friendly Legislature. Legislative gatekeepers may not even give this plan a full hearing.  An important question I must ask: Why do some lawmakers fear the passage of this bill? By definition, criminals are individuals who do not abide by the law. If a
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Parental rights are sacred … except when they are not

Parents have rights, by golly, and state lawmakers are working tirelessly to uphold those rights. Well, sort of. Truthfully, state lawmakers would like you to know parents have rights. Except for when they don’t. The state House of Representatives voted 37-31 Wednesday in favor of House Bill 113, which says parents and legal guardians have rights to make decisions about their kids. Says the bill, “Parents and legal guardians who have legal custody of minor children have a fundamental right to make decisions concerning the care, custody, education and control of their children.” You’d think legislation like that would win
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LISTEN: National pundits highlight Idaho’s retirement spiking loophole

Two national pundits weighed in this week on a loophole in Idaho code that allows state lawmakers to add thousands of dollars to their taxpayer-funded retirement. Watchdog.org's Eric Boehm and the San Diego Tribune's Steven Greenhut highlighted the case of former Democratic Sen. Elliot Werk of Boise, who Gov. Butch Otter just appointed to a high-paying job at the Idaho State Tax Commission. If Werk stays at the job at least 42 months, he'll add $20,000 a year to his part-time legislative pension. Listen here:
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Lawmakers erect another barrier to entry, economic progress

The pattern is a familiar one: An occupation, business, or industry gains some prominence, gets some scale and then looks around for ways to limit entry into their profession. Usually industry insiders tell us new rules or regulations will serve the public or, for more poignancy, protect a disadvantaged segment of society. Industry, with the help of well-intentioned lawmakers, repeated this pattern Wednesday as the House Health and Welfare Committee approved a bill for new regulations on sign language interpreters. The interpreters gave the legislation their enthusiastic support. One of the selling points of occupational licensure, according to the fiscal
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