Don’t blame right-to-work

Any regular reader of newspapers in Idaho has probably read that average wages in Idaho are among the lowest in the United States and that Idaho’s per capita income ranks near the bottom in state rankings. Idaho’s enactment of a right-to-work law 30 years ago is often cited as having depressed wages. Right-to-work laws ended compulsory unionism and exist in 24 states. It is true that wage growth prior to the mid-1980s in Idaho surpassed wage growth after right-to-work was enacted, but that hardly demonstrates cause and effect. Why don’t critics of right-to-work examine the changing composition of jobs in
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KTVB’s journalism malpractice on Medicaid

I understand journalism is a fast-paced job, with an ever-hungry audience searching for the latest click-bait. Sometimes, feeding the beast is the sole objective. Still, journalists at least feigning objectivity have a duty to inform the voting public and offer differing views on important issues. That’s where KTVB fell short this week. In a Monday night report about the expansion of government health care, the station offered only glowing reviews of the plan that would add 103,000 more people to the state’s Medicaid program. What spurred the report? The Idaho Center for Fiscal Policy, which is housed at the Mountain
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Where you live need not limit your access to legislators 

When a new state government parking garage opened north of the Statehouse recently, Boise Sen. Chuck Winder declared the project “the last piece of the puzzle in that effort to make the Capitol building more accessible.” I hope that is not really the case. If you live in the Boise area, perhaps the fact that the parking garage makes new parking spaces available to state employees and legislators is helpful because, supposedly, streetside spaces will be freed for public use during the legislative session. We shall see if that really is true. But if you live in Sandpoint, Challis, Rexburg,
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Someone, not Santa, is always watching  

A paper recently published by a professor in Canada suggests that the popular “Elf on the Shelf” game is conditioning children to accept the surveillance state. The notion of the Elf on the Shelf is that a small elf doll is actually a scout elf who reports nightly to Santa Claus on the activities that occur in his house. Parents are supposed to reinforce this story by relocating the elf each night so that his journey and return seem more plausible. While this phenomenon started after my childhood, it is really just an expansion of the warning that Santa “sees
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No more grocery tax

The voice of opposition to Idaho’s tax on your family’s groceries grows louder. Last week, the Idaho Press-Tribune, Nampa, delivered an endorsement for repealing Idaho’s grocery tax, which hurts Gem State families and encourages government waste. With just weeks until lawmakers begin their business in Boise, the paper’s call comes at just the right time. The paper reeled off just a few of the reason’s full repeal of the tax is a no-brainer for legislators: It empowers people over government, cuts wasteful spending and it would help the poorest Idahoans. In the editorial board’s own words: “It wastes manpower, not
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