Don’t be fooled by political labels during an election cycle

As we move closer to another election season, politicians, the major media and academic experts will serve up a rich menu of political labels for the electorate to digest. Words like “right-wing” or “Tea Party” are to be expected, but even more conventional words like “conservative,” “liberal” or “moderate” should also be viewed with skepticism. In the waning days of the Soviet Union, those who wanted to keep the empire together, staunch Communists, were called conservatives. In the U.S., during Reagan’s ascendancy, the word liberal became synonymous with political permissiveness as well as big spending. Fast forward to today and
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Warrantless blood draw under consideration at the Idaho Supreme Court

On Aug. 20, the Idaho Supreme Court heard oral argument in State of Idaho v. Micah Abraham Wulff. The Wulff case involves the admissibility of evidence obtained via a warrantless blood draw after Micah Wulff was taken into custody under suspicion of driving under the influence. The Supreme Court of the United States examined the issue of warrantless blood draws in Missouri v. McNeely, in which the court held that the natural metabolism of alcohol in the bloodstream does not constitute a per se exigency sufficient to justify an exception to the Fourth Amendment’s search warrant requirement for non-consensual blood
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What Idaho should learn from Burger King’s ‘tax inversion’ merger

Burger King is in talks to buy a Canadian coffee and donut chain. While this is an interesting development for a number of reasons including the $18 billion entity that would be formed by a merger, what struck me in particular was that Burger King is planning to relocate its headquarters to Ontario, Canada, as part of the deal. The relocation of a major corporation is not a decision entered into lightly, but Burger King has several million reasons to relocate thanks to Canada’s 15 percent national corporate tax rate instituted by the conservative Canadian government. Even combined with Ontario’s
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Bad policy is bad policy no matter how it pops up

It’s interesting that some legislators are intrigued by Dr. Ted Epperly’s suggestion that Idaho voters be asked to approve expansion of Medicaid. Frustrated by the Legislature’s unwillingness to act on the matter, Epperly, a member of the governor’s task force on the topic of Medicaid in Idaho, said at a recent meeting of the panel, “Perhaps we need a statewide initiative, and we’ll take this directly to the people of the state of Idaho.” I wouldn’t be shocked to see Big Medicine move forward with such a plan to convince Idaho voters that Medicaid expansion is the right thing to
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The EPA: Among the most feared three-letters in the alphabet

The latest target for the EPA, according to a story from north Idaho, is the wood and pellet stove. Wood stoves currently must not emit more than 7.5 grams per hour of particulate emissions. In February the EPA could decide to move that number down to 4.5 grams, to be followed by a requirement that the standard be 1.3 grams by 2020. Expressed differently, in 2015 new stoves could be forced to reduce their emissions by 60 percent, then a few years later by another 29 percent. Arguing against cleaner air is akin to being against baseball and hotdogs. But,
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