Senate Bill 1060

Phil Haunschild 2017 Senate bill ratings

Bill description: Taxpayers would fund a new government program in which the Department of Health and Welfare would educate the public about Cytomegalovirus prevention.

Rating: -1

Analyst note: “Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a common virus that can infect almost anyone,”  according to the Mayo Clinic. “Most people don’t know they have CMV because it rarely causes symptoms. However, if you’re pregnant or have a weakened immune system, CMV is cause for concern. Once infected with CMV, your body retains the virus for life. However, CMV usually remains dormant if you’re healthy.

“CMV spreads from person to person through body fluids, such as blood, saliva, urine, semen and breast milk. CMV spread through breast milk usually doesn’t make the baby sick. However, if you are pregnant and develop an active infection, you can pass the virus to your baby.

“There’s no cure for CMV, but drugs can help treat newborns and people with weak immune systems.”

Does it create, expand, or enlarge any agency, board, program, function, or activity of government?

This bill establishes a new function for and expands the role of the Department of Health and Welfare. The Department will be responsible for educating the public on what causes CMV, how it affects individuals, and what the best practices are for its prevention. In doing so, it puts the agency, which uses taxpayer dollars, in competition with private sector efforts to educate about and combat this virus. (-1)

Updated 2/28 to include more precise language.