SB 1324 - Barber and cosmetology licensure reform

SB 1324 - Barber and cosmetology licensure reform

by
Phil Haunschild
March 6, 2018

Bill description: SB 1324 would combine the boards of barbering and cosmetology. Further, SB 1324 would reduce the barriers to entry for both professions.

Rating: +5

Does it give government any new, additional, or expanded power to prohibit, restrict, or regulate activities in the free market? Conversely, does it eliminate or reduce government intervention in the market? 

Currently, anyone licensed as a barber, cosmetologist, esthetician, and the like, must work within a licensed establishment at a fixed place of business. In only a few instances may a licensed professional perform offsite services for pay, for example, for a customer who cannot travel to a licensed establishment. SB 1324 would allow any individual licensed under the newly established Barber and Cosmetology Services Licensing Board to practice their trade outside of a licensed fixed-place establishment for compensation. This would allow licensees to work at events like weddings and would afford them to offer better customer service. Customers would also benefit from more flexibility in when and where they receive services from these professionals.

(+1)

SB 1324 would allow licensed cosmetologists to obtain a license as a barber and vice versa with reduced hour requirements. The maximum number of hours required for the cosmetologist to receive a license to practice as a barber would be 100 hours.

(+1)

SB 1324 would allow individuals who are licensed in another state or jurisdiction, who are temporarily in Idaho, to perform cosmetology or barbering services for theatrical or visual arts productions. Groups traveling into Idaho, such as filmmakers and theater performers, could perform their work in Idaho with their preferred makeup artists, without having to obtain a special license.

(+1)

Does it increase barriers to entry into the market? Examples include occupational licensure, the minimum wage, and restrictions on home businesses. Conversely, does it remove barriers to entry into the market? 

SB 1324 would reduce the hours of schooling required for a cosmetology license from 2000, one of the highest requirements in the country, to 1600.

(+1)

SB 1324 would lower the hours of study required to obtain an electrology license from 800 to 600.

(+1)

SB 1324 would allow makeup artists to practice their profession in Idaho without having to obtain a full esthetics or cosmetology license.

(+1)

Does it directly or indirectly create or increase any taxes, fees, or other assessments? Conversely, does it eliminate or reduce any taxes, fees, or other assessments? 

SB 1324 would require all retail thermal-styling equipment dealers (e.g., curling irons, flat irons, etc.)  to pay a $50 fee to register with the state board. (-1)

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